Skip Global Navigation to Main Content
  •  
Skip Breadcrumb Navigation
CDC
 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in Malawi since 2001. Through the U.S. government and local partners, CDC helps the Malawi Ministry of Health (MoH) achieve national public health goals by training health workers and by providing technical and financial assistance to improve surveillance systems, medical informatics, monitoring and evaluation, laboratories, care and treatment, and prevention efforts throughout the country. Malawi is known for having one of the most innovative and efficient HIV programs in the world, and CDC Malawi is proud to be a key contributor to supporting Malawi to achieve an AIDS-free generation.  CDC Malawi also receives support from the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) and primarily focuses on monitoring and evaluation of malaria interventions and operations research which guide policy and decision making in country.  In addition to those areas, CDC Malawi remains heavily engaged in supporting other activities across the health sector to include emergency obstetrics and outbreak investigations. 

Program included in the CDC Malawi’s portfolio include:

  1. HIV/AIDS through the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) http://www.pepfar.gov/about/122588.htm
  2. President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI)  http://www.fightingmalaria.gov/

To learn more, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/globalhealth/countries/malawi/

Follow CDC Malawi on Twitter @CDCMalawi

 

Innovative policy to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV shows positive impact

On Tuesday March 5th Dr. Beth Barr presented on Option B+ on the behalf of the Malawi Ministry of Health at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI).  The new treatment option, called Option B+, offers all pregnant or breastfeeding women infected with HIV lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART), regardless of the stage of their HIV infection. The number of pregnant and breastfeeding women in Malawi with HIV who started life-saving antiretroviral treatment increased by more than 700 percent in one year, according to a study in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Click to view the video broadcast 

Mortality and Morbility Press Release (PDF 139KB)